• Amanda

There, We Fixed It

This weekend, The Washington Post published a fun list of books for every year of life. While we appreciate the intent, we'd be sleeping on the job if we didn't notice that, by age 10, they've only recommended books with two female protagonists (20%) and only two of the protagonists are a person of color - one male, one female (20%). It's almost like they're proving our point...


It gets better in the YA section, but there's plenty of wonderful, representative #kidlit available for years one through ten! We're here to fix it, Spitfire style:


Spitfire Reads for Ages 1-10

(disclosure: links below are affiliate links. At no cost to you, Spitfire will earn a commission from any purchases you make using them)


Age 1

More, More, More Said the Baby

by Vera B. Williams

Because all babies love belly raspberries, tickles, and (hopefully) a good sleep.


Age 2

All the World

by Liz Garton Scanlon

It's never too early to learn how interdependent we are.


Age 3

The Dot

by Peter H. Reynolds

Growth mindset is a lifelong skill. No one is born a master.


Age 4

The Most Magnificent Thing

by Ashley Spires

It may not work the first, second, or even third time. But there isn't much that a deep breath and a cupcake can't fix.


Age 5

Marisol McDonald Doesn't Match/Marisol McDonald No Combina

by Monica Brown

"I want you to know that I like you just the way you are."


Age 6

Mae Among the Stars

by Roda Ahmed

When someone asks "What do you want to be when you grow up?" (even though you're only six and this is a really annoying question) please know that there's no wrong answer.


Age 7

Jasmine Toguchi: Mochi Queen

by Debbi Michiko Florence

We agree with WaPo, it's not your fault. Older siblings can be the worst, but they can also be redeemed.


Age 8

Beatrice Zinker, Upside Down Thinker

by Shelley Johannes

Friendship can get difficult but a little trust and unconventional thinking can patch things up nicely.


Age 9

Sarai and the Meaning of Awesome

by Sarai Gonzalez and Monica Brown

Life happens, things fall apart, and family brings it all back together. Also, cupcakes.


Age 10

Brown Girl Dreaming

by Jacqueline Woodson

Girls feel like they're straddling two worlds at ten--finding your community and your own voice is critical to staying above the fray.


Age 10 - Bonus!

Amina's Voice

Hena Khan

Keeping with the theme, another narrative about finding strength in your community and in your own voice. Ten's a tough age. It deserves two books.

73 views
  • Facebook - White Circle
  • Instagram - White Circle
  • Pinterest - White Circle
  • YouTube - White Circle

for questions or more information, email info@thespitfireclub.org

© 2018 The Spitfire Club

Website and Donor Privacy Policy

Most of the lovely photos on this website were taken by Jim Hazelwood. Learn more about his work at jameshazelwoodphotography.com